MiniBooNE detector tank array of photodetector…

MiniBooNE detector tank array of photodetectors used to pick up the light particles that are created when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus inside the tank.

Credit: Reidar Hahn

Via Phys.org: Neutrino experiment at Fermilab delivers an unprecedented measurement

A cool story by the way…

Like other muon neutrino experiments, MiniBooNE uses a beam that comprises muon neutrinos with a range of energies. Since neutrinos have no electric charge, scientists have no “filter” that allows them to select neutrinos with a specific energy.

MiniBooNE scientists, however, came up with a clever way to identify the energy of a subset of the muon neutrinos hitting their detector. They realized that their experiment receives some muon neutrinos that have the exact energy of 236 million electronvolts (MeV). These neutrinos stem from the decay of kaons at rest about 86 meters from the MiniBooNE detector emerging from the aluminum core of the particle absorber of the NuMI beamline, which was built for other experiments at Fermilab.

Energetic kaons decay into muon neutrinos with a range of energies. The trick is to identify muon neutrinos that emerge from the decay of kaons at rest. Conservation of energy and momentum then require that all muon neutrinos emerging from the kaon-at-rest decay have to have exactly the energy of 236 MeV.

Paper (PRL): First Measurement of Monoenergetic Muon Neutrino Charged Current InteractionsPDF