Category: art

Celebrating Jean-Michel Basquiat today with this beautiful animation!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The chaotic brilliance of artist Jean-Michel Basquiat – Jordana Moore Saggese

Animation by Héloïse Dorsan Rachet

teded:

“Learning never exhausts the mind.” 

Happy birthday, Leonardo da Vinci!

From the TED-Ed Lesson Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man of math – James Earle

Animation by TED-Ed

teded:

“Learning never exhausts the mind.” 

Happy birthday, Leonardo da Vinci!

From the TED-Ed Lesson Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man of math – James Earle

Animation by TED-Ed

teded:

10 facts on the highly influential Spanish artist.

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Pablo Picasso, Self Portrait, 1907

1. Pablo Picasso was born in Malaga, Spain on October 25, 1881. His father was an artist and art teacher in the classic European style.

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Pablo Picasso, The old fisherman, 1895

2. As a teenager, Picasso studied at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid. There he learned how to paint realistic images of people and landscapes, just like his father had before him. 

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3. At school, Picasso began to question the conventional art wisdom in Europe. For example, why should a portrait strive to duplicate reality from a single viewpoint, when the recent invention of photography made it possible for anyone with the right equipment to accurately portray a person’s face?

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Pablo Picasso, The old blind guitarist, 1903 // Pablo Picasso, A boy with pipe, 1905

4. In his early 20s, Picasso began to experiment with new ways to create meaning through unconventional brushwork styles and color palettes of blue and rose. His first exhibit was not a financial success.

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5. Picasso moved to Paris and became friends with a group of painters and writers who were also pushing the boundaries of what was considered to be “acceptable” art in Europe. One of these avant-garde painters was the French post-Impressionist artist Paul Gaugin. Another was Henri Matisse.

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Self Portraits: Paul Gaugin // Pablo Picasso // Henri Matisse

6. Gaugin and Matisse introduced Picasso to a variety of non-European art forms, viewpoints and ideas.

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7. Picasso found one non-European art form particularly enchanting: African masks, traditionally used in ritual storytelling.

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8. Inspired by the African art he’d seen, Picasso created the painting Les Demoiselles d’Avignon.

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Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907

9. While most of Picasso’s friends disliked the multifaceted style of Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, he found a kindred spirit in George Braque. Together, they invented a new art form that embraced many angles and viewpoints. Matisse called this “Cubism.”

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10. Picasso is known for Cubism — but he created much more than that. Throughout his life, Picasso kept learning and experimenting with new art forms and types of media, and he continued to paint, sculpt and draw in a variety of styles. Today he is considered to be one of the most influential European artists of the 20th century.

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For a deeper dive into ancient influences on modern art, watch How ancient art influenced modern art – Felipe Galindo

Paintings by Pablo Picasso, Paul Gauguin, and Henri Matisse

Animation by TED-Ed

Happy Birthday, Pablo Picasso!

teded:

On this day in 1911, Italian nationalist, Vincenzo Peruggia, stole the Mona Lisa from the Louvre. The painting was missing for more than 2 years, but in December 1913, Peruggia was finally caught and the Mona Lisa, now the subject of a major news story and a household name, was recovered.

The disappearance of Da Vinci’s painting was briefly attributed to French poet and radical, Guillaume Apollinaire, who was even arrested in September of 1911 as the prime suspect in the theft, but after five days with no evidence, he was released.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The poet who painted with his words – Geneviève Emy

Animation by TED-Ed and @charlottecambon

Hallucinatory experiences are much more closely tied to ordinary perception than we once thought.

We know from fMRI studies that hallucinations activate the same brain areas as sight, areas that are not activated by imagination. Many other hallucinations, including smells, sights, and sounds, also involve the same brain areas as real sensory experiences. Because of this, the cerebral cortex is thought to play a part in hallucinations. This thin layer of grey matter covers the entire cerebrum, with different areas processing information from each of our senses. But even in people with completely unimpaired senses, the brain constructs the world we perceive from incomplete information. 

For example, our eyes have blind spots where the optic nerve blocks part of the retina. When the visual cortex processes light into coherent images, it fills in these blind spots with information from the surrounding area. Occasionally, we might notice a glitch, but most of the time we’re none the wiser. When the visual cortex is deprived of input from the eyes, even temporarily, the brain still tries to create a coherent picture, but the limits of its abilities become a lot more obvious. 

By studying hallucinations, we stand to learn a great deal about how our brains construct the world we see, hear, smell, and touch. As we learn more, we’ll likely come to appreciate just how subjective and individual each person’s island universe of perception really is.

For more on the science and research of hallucinations, check out the TED-Ed Lesson What causes hallucinations? – Elizabeth Cox

Animation by Nerdo

Since the time of Homer, ancient stories told of fierce warriors dwelling beyond the Mediterranean world, striking fear into the mightiest empires of antiquity. Their exploits were recounted by many epic poets. They fought in the legendary Trojan War and their grand army invaded Athens. Jason and the Argonauts passed by their shores, barely avoiding their deadly arrows. These formidable fighters faced off against the greatest champions of myth: Heracles, Theseus, and Achilles. 

And every single one of these warriors was a woman.

The war-loving Amazons, “the equals of men” in courage and skill, were familiar to everyone in ancient Greece. But were Amazons merely figures of myth, or something more?

Watch the TED-Ed Lesson Did the Amazons really exist? – Adrienne Mayor to uncover the mysteries of these women warriors.

Animation by Silvia Prietov

lea–krawczyk:

Last summer i’ve made a commissioned film for TED-ed lessons ! What a great experience. It’s about the myth of Prometheus. You can check the film here : https://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-myth-of-prometheus-iseult-gillespie

Here are some color researches !

We love when artists share their behind-the-scenes of TED-Ed Lessons! 

Here, Léa Krawczyk shares her color studies for her beautifully designed animation on the The myth of Prometheus!

Check out Léa’s tumblr for more behind-the-scenes and her other stunning illustration + animation work.

From the TED-Ed Lesson The myth of Prometheus – Iseult Gillespie

Animation by Léa Krawczyk ( @lea–krawczyk )

teded:

Can plants talk to each other? It certainly doesn’t seem that way: They don’t have complex sensory or nervous systems, like animals do, and they look pretty passive. But odd as it sounds, plants can communicate with each other — especially when they’re under attack. 

From the TED-Ed Lesson Can plants talk to each other? – Richard Karban

Animation by Yukai Du / @yukaidu 

teded:

One of the most amazing things about poetry is its seemingly infinite capacity for interpretation. To illustrate that fact, TED-Ed launched a great poetic experiment. We gave one Walt Whitman poem to three of our in-house animators, and asked them to interpret it using three different styles of animation. They were each given a recording of the text to work from, which was supplied by three local poets who also interpreted the text using their voices. The result? A stunning video that breathes three very different lives into Walt Whitman’s timeless poem, “A Noiseless Patient Spider.” 

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Interpretation #1 by Jeremiah Dickey

Medium: Paint on Glass

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Interpretation #2 by Biljana Labovic

Medium: Video

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Interpretation #3 by Lisa LaBracio

Medium: Scratchboard

Watch all of the interpretations here: A poetic experiment: Walt Whitman, interpreted by three animators – Justin Moore

Happy Birthday to Walt Whitman today!