Category: birthday

teded:

teded:

One of the most amazing things about poetry is its seemingly infinite capacity for interpretation. To illustrate that fact, TED-Ed launched a great poetic experiment. We gave one Walt Whitman poem to three of our in-house animators, and asked them to interpret it using three different styles of animation. They were each given a recording of the text to work from, which was supplied by three local poets who also interpreted the text using their voices. The result? A stunning video that breathes three very different lives into Walt Whitman’s timeless poem, “A Noiseless Patient Spider.” 

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Interpretation #1 by Jeremiah Dickey

Medium: Paint on Glass

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Interpretation #2 by Biljana Labovic

Medium: Video

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Interpretation #3 by Lisa LaBracio

Medium: Scratchboard

Watch all of the interpretations here: A poetic experiment: Walt Whitman, interpreted by three animators – Justin Moore

Happy Birthday to Walt Whitman today!

Today, we celebrate Walt Whitman’s 200th birthday!
Happy birthday, Walt!!

Happy 455th, William Shakespeare!

Let Shakespeare be your matchmaker in Shakespearean dating tips – Anthony John Peters

Animation by Kat Llewellyn

teded:

teded:

But, really. How do you know you’re real?

In his ‘Meditations on First Philosophy’, René Descartes tried to answer that very question, demolishing all of his preconceived notions and opinions to begin again from the foundations.

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Sure, you have your senses. But your senses often deceive you. Maybe the body you perceive yourself to have isn’t really there. Maybe all of reality, even its abstract concepts like time, shape, color, and numbers are false.

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And, who’s to say you’re not dreaming? When you’re awake, you know you’re awake. But, when you’re not, do you know you’re not? How do we know that this right here is not a dream? What if you’ve been tricked into believing that reality is real? The world, your perceptions of it, your very body – you can’t disprove that they’re all just made up. And how could you exist without them? You couldn’t, so – you don’t.

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Life is but a dream, and I bet you aren’t row-row-rowing the boat merrily at all. You’re rowing it wearily. Like the duped, non-existent doof you are/aren’t. 

Don’t buy it? Good. Have you been persuaded? Even better. Because by being persuaded, you would prove that you are a persuaded being. You can’t be nothing if you think you’re something, even if that something…is nothing. Because no matter what you think, you’re a thinking thing.

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Or, as Descartes put it, “I think, therefore I am.”

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And so are you. Really.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do you know you exist? – James Zucker

Animation by Stretch Films, Inc.

Sending a shout out to René Descartes on his birthday!

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do you know you exist? – James Zucker

Animation by Stretch Films, Inc.

teded:

teded:

But, really. How do you know you’re real?

In his ‘Meditations on First Philosophy’, René Descartes tried to answer that very question, demolishing all of his preconceived notions and opinions to begin again from the foundations.

image

Sure, you have your senses. But your senses often deceive you. Maybe the body you perceive yourself to have isn’t really there. Maybe all of reality, even its abstract concepts like time, shape, color, and numbers are false.

image

And, who’s to say you’re not dreaming? When you’re awake, you know you’re awake. But, when you’re not, do you know you’re not? How do we know that this right here is not a dream? What if you’ve been tricked into believing that reality is real? The world, your perceptions of it, your very body – you can’t disprove that they’re all just made up. And how could you exist without them? You couldn’t, so – you don’t.

image

Life is but a dream, and I bet you aren’t row-row-rowing the boat merrily at all. You’re rowing it wearily. Like the duped, non-existent doof you are/aren’t. 

Don’t buy it? Good. Have you been persuaded? Even better. Because by being persuaded, you would prove that you are a persuaded being. You can’t be nothing if you think you’re something, even if that something…is nothing. Because no matter what you think, you’re a thinking thing.

image

Or, as Descartes put it, “I think, therefore I am.”

image

And so are you. Really.

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do you know you exist? – James Zucker

Animation by Stretch Films, Inc.

Sending a shout out to René Descartes on his birthday!

From the TED-Ed Lesson How do you know you exist? – James Zucker

Animation by Stretch Films, Inc.

“The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost:

Today, we celebrate Robert Frost’s birthday.

We are excited to start our day with an animation of his poem “The Road Not Taken” from our recent animated poetry series.

For an analysis of the poem, check out this video and for more animated poetry, check out this series.

Animation directed by Ellen Su.

“The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost:

Today, we celebrate Robert Frost’s birthday.

We are excited to start our day with an animation of his poem “The Road Not Taken” from our recent animated poetry series.

For an analysis of the poem, check out this video and for more animated poetry, check out this series.

Animation directed by Ellen Su.

Happy Birthday, Albert Einstein!

From the TED-Ed Lesson How fiction can change reality – Jessica Wise

Animation by Augenblick Studios

Happy Birthday, Albert Einstein!

From the TED-Ed Lesson How fiction can change reality – Jessica Wise

Animation by Augenblick Studios

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Happy Birthday to Virginia Woolf! 

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why should you read Virginia Woolf? – Iseult Gillespie

Animation by Sarah Saidan

teded:

Happy Birthday to French philosopher, Simone de Beauvoir! 

“Love lets us reach beyond ourselves.”

Simone de Beauvoir proposed that love is the desire to integrate with another and that it infuses our lives with meaning.  However, she was less concerned with why we love and more interested in how we can love better.  She saw that the problem with traditional romantic love is it can be so captivating that we are tempted to make it our only reason for being.  Yet, dependence on another to justify our existence easily leads to boredom and power games.  

To avoid this trap, Beauvoir advised loving authentically, which is more like a great friendship: lovers support each other in discovering themselves, reaching beyond themselves, and enriching their lives and the world, together.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Why do we love? A philosophical inquiry – Skye C. Cleary

Animation by Avi Ofer