Category: earth week

Tomorrow’s the big day! Get outside and apprec…

Hi Tumblr-errrrs! We here at TED-Ed believe that every week is Earth Week – but that hasn’t stopped us from celebrating Earth Week hard this week! We hope you’ve enjoyed our tips on how to do right by Mother Earth and give her the love she deserves. Every little bit counts! (And every lotta bit counts even more!!)

Tomorrow’s the big day! Get outside and appreciate our beautiful planet. Plant some flowers meant for bees + butterflies. Organize a trash pick-up sesh. Join the litterati. Spread the good word! <3

5 actions to protect birds where you live

How do birds learn to sing? – Partha MitraWelcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr! We’ll be sharing ways for you to be a more considerate resident of Planet Earth all week (that you can apply…all year!)

In honor of Earth Day, we took a few tips from Audubon on how to take action to protect birds! We’ve paired them with some of our favorite bird visuals from our TED-Ed Lessons <3

1. Reduce or eliminate pesticide and herbicide use. By using few chemicals in and around your home, you will help keep birds, pets, and your family healthy.

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2. Plant native plants. Native flora provides birds with food in the form of fruit and seeds, and is home to tasty invertebrates like bugs and spiders.

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3. Identify the non-native invasive plants in your region, and work to remove them from your yard. And don’t bring any new invasives into your backyard! Invasives don’t provide as much good food or habitat as natives do, and can threaten healthy ecosystems.

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4. Attract hummingbirds with sugar water, made by combining four parts hot water to one part white sugar, boiled for one to two minutes. Never use honey, artificial sweeteners, or food coloring. Clean hummingbird feeders with a solution of one part white vinegar to four parts water once a week.

5. Make your windows visible to birds to prevent crashes. Put up screens, close drapes and blinds when you leave the house, or stick multiple decals on the glass (decals need to be no more than two to four inches apart to be effective).

And here are some TED-Ed Lessons to watch for the love of the birds:

Bird migration, a perilous journey – Alyssa Klavans

How do birds learn to sing? – Partha Mitra

How did feathers evolve? – Carl Zimmer

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Week!

Artwork & Animation above by Artrake Studio, Lisa LaBracio + Tara Sunil Thomas, & Compote Collective.

teded: Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr…

teded:

Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr! We’ll be sharing ways for you to be a more considerate resident of Planet Earth all week (that you can apply…all year!)

How could you dispose of your cooking oil when you’re done cooking? The easiest thing to do might be to pour it down your drain — but if you save it up and send it to a processing plant, it can gain useful new life as biodiesel, a biodegradable energy source which can run in diesel engines instead of refined petroleum.

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Week!

From the TED-Ed Lesson Biodiesel: The afterlife of oil – Natascia Radice

Animation by Lippy

Countdown to Earth Day 2018!

The Life Cycle of a Plastic Bottle

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We’ve all been told that we should recycle plastic bottles and containers. But what actually happens to the plastic if we just throw it away? Here are the life cycles of three different plastic bottles.

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Bottle One, like hundreds of millions of tons of its plastic brethren, ends up in a landfill. This huge dump expands each day, as more trash moves in and continues to take up space. 

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As plastics sit there being compressed, rainwater flows through the waste and absorbs the water soluble compounds it contains, and some of those are highly toxic. Together they create a harmful stew called “leachate”, which can move into groundwater, soil, and streams, poisoning ecosystems and harming wildlife. It can take Bottle One an agonizing 1,000 years to decompose.

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Bottle Two floats on a trickle that reaches a stream, a stream that flows into a river, and a river that reaches the ocean. After months lost at sea, it’s slowly drawn into a massive vortex, where trash accumulates – place known as “The Great Pacific Garbage Patch.” This is one of five plastic filled gyres in the worlds seas. 

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Some animals mistake the brightly colored plastic bits for food. Plastic makes them feel full when they’re not, so they starve to death, passing the toxins from the plastic up the food chain, eventually to us.

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Bottle Three, on the other hand, is recycled. It’s taken away on a truck to a plant, where it and its companions are squeezed flat and compressed into a block. The blocks are shredded into tiny pieces, which are washed and melted, so they become the raw materials that can be used again. Bottle Three is ready to be reborn, as something new.

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So, what can you do? First – reduce your use of plastic altogether! And when you do find yourself needing to buy a bottle, don’t forget to recycle it. You’ll be doing Planet Earth a great, big favor.

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From the TED-Ed Lesson What really happens to the plastic you throw away – Emma Bryce

Animation by Sharon Colman Graham

Counting down to Earth Day 2018! Here’s an act you can perform every day to help love our Earth better.

teded: Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr…

teded:

Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr! We’ll be sharing ways for you to be a more considerate resident of Planet Earth all week (that you can apply…all year!)

In the past decade, the US honeybee population has been decreasing at an alarming and unprecedented rate. But why?

Emma Bryce offers some explanations in the TED-Ed Lesson The case of the vanishing honeybees.

One solution?  Plant flowers! In Marla Spivak’s TED Talk Why bees are disappearing, she reminds us that when bees have access to good nutrition, we have access to good nutrition through their pollination services.  

So get out there, Tumblr – and plant some bee-friendly flowers!

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Week!

Animation by Lillian Chan

Counting down to Earth Day 2018!

teded: Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr!…

teded:

Welcome to Earth Week on TED-Ed Tumblr! Once again, we’ll be sharing ways for you to be a more considerate resident of Planet Earth all week (that you can apply…all year!)

Nearly one third of our food ends up in the trash can. That’s an estimated 1.3 billion tons.  America alone spends an estimate 165 billion dollars a year managing food waste. We’re wasting food, energy, and money.

But there’s another way! More and more people, even city dwellers, are taking to composting – it saves on landfill space, betters air quality, and if you have a green thumb – provides you with free soil! One method is vermicomposting, and to learn more about that, you can watch the TED-Ed lesson Vermicomposting: How worms can reduce our waste – Matthew Ross. But if worms aren’t your style, check out some simple DIY compost methods here and here and here.

Finally, if you simply have no space for soil, check out your local farm markets – chances are you can freeze your compost or keep it in a small countertop bin, and drop it off every week.

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Week!

Animation by Cinematic Sweden

Counting down to Earth Day 2018!