Category: teded

Oh, hi, didn’t see you there.

Oh, hi, didn’t see you there.

Excuse us while we get ready for a little summer vacation! See you again in the Fall!

From the TED-Ed Lesson Which sunscreen should you choose? – Mary Poffenroth with animation by Rob Kohr & Travis Spangler

What is imposter syndrome?

image

Even after writing eleven books and winning several prestigious awards, Maya Angelou couldn’t escape the nagging doubt that she hadn’t really earned her accomplishments. 

image

Albert Einstein experienced something similar: he described himself as an “involuntary swindler” whose work didn’t deserve as much attention as it had received. Accomplishments at the level of Angelou’s or Einstein’s are rare, but their feeling of fraudulence is extremely common. Why can’t so many of us shake feelings that we haven’t earned our accomplishments, or that our ideas and skills aren’t worthy of others’ attention?

image

Psychologist Pauline Rose Clance was the first to study this unwarranted sense of insecurity. She and her patients experienced something that goes by a number of names– imposter phenomenon, imposter experience, and imposter syndrome. Together with colleague Suzanne Imes, Clance first studied imposterism in female college students and faculty. Their work established pervasive feelings of fraudulence in this group. Since that first study, the same thing has been established across gender, race, age, and a huge range of occupations, though it may be more prevalent and disproportionately affect the experiences of underrepresented or disadvantaged groups. 

image

To call it a syndrome is to downplay how universal it is. It’s not a disease or an abnormality, and it isn’t necessarily tied to depression, anxiety, or self-esteem. Where do these feelings of fraudulence come from? People who are highly skilled or accomplished tend to think others are just as skilled. This can spiral into feelings that they don’t deserve accolades and opportunities over other people. And as Angelou and Einstein experienced, there’s often no threshold of accomplishment that puts these feelings to rest.

image

The good news? Talking about imposter syndrome helps! Hearing that an advisor or mentor has experienced feelings of imposterism can help relieve those feelings. The same goes for peers. Even simply finding out there’s a term for these feelings can be an incredible relief. Once you’re aware of the phenomenon, you can combat your own imposter syndrome by collecting and revisiting positive feedback. One scientist who kept blaming herself for problems in her lab started to document the causes every time something went wrong. Eventually, she realized most of the problems came from equipment failure, and came to recognize her own competence. We may never be able to banish these feelings entirely, but we can have open conversations about academic or professional challenges. With increasing awareness of how common these experiences are, perhaps we can feel freer to be frank about our feelings and build confidence in some simple truths: you have talent, you are capable, and you belong.

Learn more about imposter syndrome by watching the TED-Ed Lesson What is imposter syndrome and how can you combat it? – Elizabeth Cox

Animation by Sharon Colman

teded: We just love this Earth Day TED-Ed medl…

teded:

We just love this Earth Day TED-Ed medley so much, we have to celebrate it again.

For Earth Day, we decided to create a short video that shows off the animated Earths from all of our TED-Ed lessons. We gathered more than 60 beautifully designed Planet Earths from over 600 animated lessons, and we’re so excited to share the results with you!

We hope this medley helps to celebrate our ONE beautiful Planet Earth each and every day.

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Day, Tumblr! Thanks for joining us this week!

And, an extra special shout out to the amazing composer behind this video – Cem Misirlioglu // WORKPLAYWORK.

Happy Earth Day tumblr!!

teded: We just love this Earth Day TED-Ed medl…

teded:

We just love this Earth Day TED-Ed medley so much, we have to celebrate it again.

For Earth Day, we decided to create a short video that shows off the animated Earths from all of our TED-Ed lessons. We gathered more than 60 beautifully designed Planet Earths from over 600 animated lessons, and we’re so excited to share the results with you!

We hope this medley helps to celebrate our ONE beautiful Planet Earth each and every day.

Love the Earth, and the Earth will love you back! Happy Earth Day, Tumblr! Thanks for joining us this week!

And, an extra special shout out to the amazing composer behind this video – Cem Misirlioglu // WORKPLAYWORK.

Happy Earth Day tumblr!!

How is it that Beethoven, who is celebrated as…

How is it that Beethoven, who is celebrated as one of the most significant composers of all time, wrote many of his most beloved songs while going deaf? Using the certainty of mathematics, Beethoven was able to convey emotion and creativity in his music.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Music and math: The genius of Beethoven – Natalya St. Clair

Animation by Qa’ed Mai

Today, we honor Beethoven on the 192nd anniversary of his passing.

How is it that Beethoven, who is celebrated as…

How is it that Beethoven, who is celebrated as one of the most significant composers of all time, wrote many of his most beloved songs while going deaf? Using the certainty of mathematics, Beethoven was able to convey emotion and creativity in his music.

From the TED-Ed Lesson Music and math: The genius of Beethoven – Natalya St. Clair

Animation by Qa’ed Mai

Today, we honor Beethoven on the 192nd anniversary of his passing.

6 TED-Ed lessons to watch on International Wom…

teded:

Happy International Women’s Day! Here’s a list of TED-Ed Lessons to watch as you celebrate all of the world’s women, past and present.

image

The genius of Marie Curie: Marie Skłodowska Curie’s revolutionary research laid the groundwork for our understanding of physics and chemistry, blazing trails in oncology, technology, medicine, and nuclear physics, to name a few. But what did she actually do? Shohini Ghose expounds on some of Marie Skłodowska Curie’s most revolutionary discoveries.

image

The contributions of female explorers: During the Victorian Age, women were unlikely to become great explorers, but a few intelligent, gritty and brave women made major contributions to the study of previously little-understood territory. Courtney Stephens examines three women – Marianne North, Mary Kingsley and Alexandra David-Néel – who wouldn’t take no for an answer (and shows why we should be grateful that they didn’t).

image

Equality, sports and Title IX: In 1972, U.S. Congress passed Title IX, a law which prohibited discrimination against women in schools, colleges, and universities — including school-sponsored sports. Before this law, female athletes were few and far between, and funding was even scarcer. Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall explore the significance and complexity of Title IX.

image

The true story of Sacajawea: In the early 19th century, a young Agaidika teenager named Sacajawea was enlisted by explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to aid her husband Toussaint Charbonneau as a guide to the Western United States. Karen Mensing debunks some of the myths that surround the familiar image of the heroic woman with a baby strapped to her back and a vast knowledge of the American wilderness.

image

Why should you read Virginia Woolf?: How best can we understand the internal experience of alienation? In both her essays and her fiction, Virginia Woolf shapes the slippery nature of subjective experience into words, while her characters frequently lead inner lives that are deeply at odds with their external existence. Iseult Gillespie helps make sense of these disparities to prepare you for the next time you read Virgina Woolf.

image

The pharaoh that wouldn’t be forgotten: Hatshepsut was a female pharaoh during the New Kingdom in Egypt. Twenty years after her death, somebody smashed her statues, took a chisel and attempted to erase the pharaoh’s name and image from history. But who did it? And why? Kate Green investigates Hatshepsut’s history for clues to this ancient puzzle. 

And a couple more!

A day in the life of a Mongolian queen – Anne F. Broadbridge

The breathtaking courage of Harriet Tubman – Janell Hobson

The princess who rewrote history – Leonora Neville

Did the Amazons really exist? – Adrienne Mayor

How one scientist averted a national health crisis – Andrea Tone

The most successful pirate of all time – Dian Murray

6 TED-Ed lessons to watch on International Wom…

teded:

Happy International Women’s Day! Here’s a list of TED-Ed Lessons to watch as you celebrate all of the world’s women, past and present.

image

The genius of Marie Curie: Marie Skłodowska Curie’s revolutionary research laid the groundwork for our understanding of physics and chemistry, blazing trails in oncology, technology, medicine, and nuclear physics, to name a few. But what did she actually do? Shohini Ghose expounds on some of Marie Skłodowska Curie’s most revolutionary discoveries.

image

The contributions of female explorers: During the Victorian Age, women were unlikely to become great explorers, but a few intelligent, gritty and brave women made major contributions to the study of previously little-understood territory. Courtney Stephens examines three women – Marianne North, Mary Kingsley and Alexandra David-Néel – who wouldn’t take no for an answer (and shows why we should be grateful that they didn’t).

image

Equality, sports and Title IX: In 1972, U.S. Congress passed Title IX, a law which prohibited discrimination against women in schools, colleges, and universities — including school-sponsored sports. Before this law, female athletes were few and far between, and funding was even scarcer. Erin Buzuvis and Kristine Newhall explore the significance and complexity of Title IX.

image

The true story of Sacajawea: In the early 19th century, a young Agaidika teenager named Sacajawea was enlisted by explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to aid her husband Toussaint Charbonneau as a guide to the Western United States. Karen Mensing debunks some of the myths that surround the familiar image of the heroic woman with a baby strapped to her back and a vast knowledge of the American wilderness.

image

Why should you read Virginia Woolf?: How best can we understand the internal experience of alienation? In both her essays and her fiction, Virginia Woolf shapes the slippery nature of subjective experience into words, while her characters frequently lead inner lives that are deeply at odds with their external existence. Iseult Gillespie helps make sense of these disparities to prepare you for the next time you read Virgina Woolf.

image

The pharaoh that wouldn’t be forgotten: Hatshepsut was a female pharaoh during the New Kingdom in Egypt. Twenty years after her death, somebody smashed her statues, took a chisel and attempted to erase the pharaoh’s name and image from history. But who did it? And why? Kate Green investigates Hatshepsut’s history for clues to this ancient puzzle. 

And a couple more!

A day in the life of a Mongolian queen – Anne F. Broadbridge

The breathtaking courage of Harriet Tubman – Janell Hobson

The princess who rewrote history – Leonora Neville

Did the Amazons really exist? – Adrienne Mayor

How one scientist averted a national health crisis – Andrea Tone

The most successful pirate of all time – Dian Murray

The historic women’s suffrage march on Washing…

On March 3, 1913, protesters parted for the woman in white: dressed in a flowing cape and sitting astride a white horse, the activist Inez Milholland was hard to miss.

She was riding at the helm of the Women’s Suffrage Parade – the first mass protest for a woman’s right to vote on a national scale. After months of strategic planning and controversy, thousands of women gathered in Washington D.C. Here, they called for a constitutional amendment granting them the right to vote.

By 1913, women’s rights activists had been campaigning for decades. As a disenfranchised group, women had no voice in the laws that affected their – or anyone else’s – lives.  However, they were struggling to secure broader support for political equality. They’d achieved no major victories since 1896, when Utah and Idaho enfranchised women. That brought the total number of states which recognized a women’s right to vote to four.

Alice Paul, inspired by the British suffragettes, proposed a massive pageant to whip up support and rejuvenate the movement. Washington authorities initially rejected her plan—and then tried to relegate the march to side streets. But Paul got those decisions overturned and confirmed a parade for the day before the presidential inauguration of Woodrow Wilson. This would maximize media coverage and grab the attention of the crowds who would be in town.

However, in planning the parade, Paul mainly focused on appealing to white women from all backgrounds, including those who were racist. She actively discouraged African American activists and organizations from participating – and stated that those who did so should march in the back.

But Black women would not be made invisible in a national movement they helped shape. On the day of the march, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, a ground-breaking investigative journalist and anti-lynching advocate, refused to move to the back and proudly marched under the Illinois banner. The co-founder of the NAACP, Mary Church Terrell, joined the parade with the 22 founders of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, an organization created by female students from Howard University. In these ways and more, Black women persevered despite deep hostility from white women in the movement, and at great political and physical risk.

On the day of the parade, suffragists assembled to create a powerful exhibition. The surging sections of the procession included international suffragists, artists, performers and business-owners. Floats came in the form of golden chariots; an enormous Liberty Bell; and a map of enfranchised countries. On the steps of the Treasury Building, performers acted out the historical achievements of women to a live orchestra.

The marchers carried on even as a mob blocked the route, hurling insults and spitting at women, tossing cigars and physically assaulting participants. The police did not intervene, and in the end, over 100 women were hospitalized.

Their mistreatment, widely reported throughout the country, catapulted the parade into the public eye—and garnered suffragists greater sympathy. National newspapers lambasted the police, and Congressional hearings investigated their actions during the parade. After the protest, the Women’s Journal declared, “Washington has been disgraced. Equal suffrage has scored a great victory.”

In this way, the march initiated a surge of support for women’s voting rights that endured in the coming years. Suffragists kept up steady pressure on their representatives, attended rallies, and petitioned the White House.

On August 18, 1920, Congress ratified the 19th amendment, finally granting women the right to vote.

Learn more about this historic moment by watching the TED-Ed Lesson The historic women’s suffrage march on Washington – Michelle Mehrtens

Animation by WOW-HOW Studio

The historic women’s suffrage march on Washing…

On March 3, 1913, protesters parted for the woman in white: dressed in a flowing cape and sitting astride a white horse, the activist Inez Milholland was hard to miss.

She was riding at the helm of the Women’s Suffrage Parade – the first mass protest for a woman’s right to vote on a national scale. After months of strategic planning and controversy, thousands of women gathered in Washington D.C. Here, they called for a constitutional amendment granting them the right to vote.

By 1913, women’s rights activists had been campaigning for decades. As a disenfranchised group, women had no voice in the laws that affected their – or anyone else’s – lives.  However, they were struggling to secure broader support for political equality. They’d achieved no major victories since 1896, when Utah and Idaho enfranchised women. That brought the total number of states which recognized a women’s right to vote to four.

Alice Paul, inspired by the British suffragettes, proposed a massive pageant to whip up support and rejuvenate the movement. Washington authorities initially rejected her plan—and then tried to relegate the march to side streets. But Paul got those decisions overturned and confirmed a parade for the day before the presidential inauguration of Woodrow Wilson. This would maximize media coverage and grab the attention of the crowds who would be in town.

However, in planning the parade, Paul mainly focused on appealing to white women from all backgrounds, including those who were racist. She actively discouraged African American activists and organizations from participating – and stated that those who did so should march in the back.

But Black women would not be made invisible in a national movement they helped shape. On the day of the march, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, a ground-breaking investigative journalist and anti-lynching advocate, refused to move to the back and proudly marched under the Illinois banner. The co-founder of the NAACP, Mary Church Terrell, joined the parade with the 22 founders of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, an organization created by female students from Howard University. In these ways and more, Black women persevered despite deep hostility from white women in the movement, and at great political and physical risk.

On the day of the parade, suffragists assembled to create a powerful exhibition. The surging sections of the procession included international suffragists, artists, performers and business-owners. Floats came in the form of golden chariots; an enormous Liberty Bell; and a map of enfranchised countries. On the steps of the Treasury Building, performers acted out the historical achievements of women to a live orchestra.

The marchers carried on even as a mob blocked the route, hurling insults and spitting at women, tossing cigars and physically assaulting participants. The police did not intervene, and in the end, over 100 women were hospitalized.

Their mistreatment, widely reported throughout the country, catapulted the parade into the public eye—and garnered suffragists greater sympathy. National newspapers lambasted the police, and Congressional hearings investigated their actions during the parade. After the protest, the Women’s Journal declared, “Washington has been disgraced. Equal suffrage has scored a great victory.”

In this way, the march initiated a surge of support for women’s voting rights that endured in the coming years. Suffragists kept up steady pressure on their representatives, attended rallies, and petitioned the White House.

On August 18, 1920, Congress ratified the 19th amendment, finally granting women the right to vote.

Learn more about this historic moment by watching the TED-Ed Lesson The historic women’s suffrage march on Washington – Michelle Mehrtens

Animation by WOW-HOW Studio